KTaping for upper limb muscles

Muscle Applications for the Upper Extremities

Trapezius

 Origin

Descending: superior nuchal line, external occipital protuberance, ligamentum nuchae

Transverse: C7–T3

Ascending: T2/3–T12

 Insertion

 Descending: lateral third of clavicle

 Transverse: end of clavicle, acromion, spine of the scapula

 Ascending: trigonum spinae

KTaping


Function

Positioning the pectoral girdle; it actively pulls the scapula and clavicle towards the spine. The upper fibers lift and turn the scapula outwards; the lower fibers lower and turn the scapula inwards.

Innervation

Accessory nerve

Application

This example illustrates a tonus-decreasing muscle application to the descending fibers of the trapezius muscle.

The tape is measured from the middle of the acromion to the hairline on the nape of the neck. The descending part of the trapezius muscle is in the elongated position, i.e., the cervical vertebrae (CV) are tilted towards the opposite side,flexion and rotation to the same side.

The base is affixed to the insertion site of the acromion in the resting state.

The muscle is elongated and the base anchored with skin displacement, then the tape is affixed with 10% tension over the belly of the muscle to the point of origin at the hairline on the nape of the neck .

The tape is rubbed in the elongated muscle position.

Deltoid

Origin

Anterior fibers: lateral third of clavicle

Middle fibers: acromion

Posterior fibers: lower lip of the spine of the scapula

Insertion

Deltoid tuberosity of humerus

Function

Abduction, adduction, anteversion, and retroversion of the shoulder joint

Innervation

Axillary nerve

Application

This example illustrates a tonus-decreasing application to the deltoid muscle.

The tape is measured from the middle of the acromion to 3-4 finger widths below the deltoid tuberosity. The addition of the 3-4 finger widths of tape means that measurement in the elongated position is unnecessary.

The base is affixed in the resting position at the point of insertion below the deltoid tuberosity so that the bifurcation point of the Y-tape lies on the deltoid tuberosity and the individual tail strips can thus be fixed more easily along the muscle margin.

The muscle is elongated and the base anchored with skin displacement. For the posterior fibers of the deltoid

muscle, the arm is placed in the flexed position. Affix the tape with 10%stretch along the muscle margin to the point of origin at the spine of the scapula. For the anterior fibers of the deltoid muscle, the arm is placed in the extended position and the tape affixed with 10% stretch along the muscle margin to the point of origin

at the clavicle.

The tape is rubbed in the elongated muscle position.

Biceps Brachii

Origin

Long head (two-joint muscle): Supraglenoid tubercle (long tendon). The first section of the tendon passes

freely through the shoulder joint.

Short head: short tendon from the apex of the coracoid process of the scapula.

Insertion

Radial tuberosity and bicipittal aponeurosis insert into the deep fascia of the ulnar side of the forearm.

Function

Flexes and supinates the forearm, tenses the antebrachial fascia.

Effect on the shoulder joint: the long head abducts and the short head adducts the shoulder joint.

Innervation

Musculocutaneous nerve (brachial plexus)

Application

This example illustrates a tonus-reducing muscle application to the biceps brachii muscle (short head).

The tape is measured from the crook of the elbow to the coracoid process. The arm is extended and lightly pronated.

The small degree of pronation makes it easier to affix the tape.

The base is attached to the insertion point of the muscle in crook of the elbow in the resting position.

The muscle is elongated with extension and pronation and the base anchored with skin displacement. The tape is affixed with 10% stretch along the muscle margin up to the origin of the short biceps head at the coracoid process.

The tape is rubbed in the elongated muscle position.

Triceps Brachii

Origin

Long head (two-joint muscle): infraglenoid tubercle of scapula

Lateral head (one-joint muscle): lateral and proximal to the groove of the radial nerve, from the dorsal surface

of the humerus

Medial head (one-joint muscle): distal to the groove of the radial nerve, from the dorsal surface of the humerus,

and from the medial and lateral intermuscular septa

Insertion

Olecranon process of the ulna; the fibers of the three heads of the muscle converge to form a single tendon.

Function

Extension in elbow joint; adduction and retroversion in shoulder joint

Innervation

Radial nerve (brachial plexus)

Application

This example illustrates a tonus-increasing muscle application to the triceps brachii muscle. The tape is measured from the shoulder blade to the elbow. The arm is positioned with shoulder and elbow flexion.

The base is affixed to the point of origin at the shoulder blade in the resting position.

The muscle is elongated and the base anchored with skin displacement. The tape is then affixed with 10%

stretch over the belly of the muscle to the point of insertion at the elbow.

The tape is rubbed in the elongated muscle position.

Infraspinatus

Origin

Infraspinous fossa, caudal edge of the spine of the scapular

Insertion

Middle facet of the greater tubercle of the humerus

Function

Externally rotates in the shoulder (rotator cuff) and abducts (cranial fibers), strengthens the shoulder joint capsule and thus acts as capsule tensor

Innervation

Suprascapular nerve (supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus)

Application

This example illustrates a muscle-toning application to the infraspinatus muscle.

The tape is measured from the vertebral border of the scapula to the greater tubercle (of humerus) with adduction and inner rotation of the arm. The base is affixed to the origin at the infraspinous

fossa in the resting position. The muscle is elongated and the base anchored with skin displacement. The tape is then affixed with 10% stretch over the muscle belly to the insertion at the greater tubercle.

The tape is rubbed in the elongated muscle position.

In this case it is important to anchor both tape tails simultaneously with skin displacement. In this example the patient is unable to fully achieve the inner rotation (IR) of the arm.

 

Reference

Birgit Kumbrink

K-Taping An Illustrated Guide

– Basics

– Techniques

– Indications

2nd edition

 

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